Make-up or no make-up?

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The art of make-up

I am a business-planner but make-up is my passion. If you want to know more about it, I can tell you I wear many hats. I work at Sultan School and am also a well-known business planner. I have helped many women to kick-start their businesses and become successful. My initiation into, or fascination for, make-up started when I was 12 years old. I had my make-up done at the salon for my cousin’s wedding. I did not like it very much. After coming home, I washed it off and applied make-up on my own. My mum was surprised and the make-up was admired by all.

This was perhaps what led me to make Lebanon Fashion what it is today – a big name in the business. I also have my own firm, Youland Beauty which expresses my love for make-up by sharing my talent to make others look beautiful.

My most successful project as a business planner has been the launch of Qansar Couture, making the brand an internationally recognized one. I also helped organise a scintillating fashion show for the brand. I am happy that I was involved in the brand reaching great heights.

I believe make-up is important to look good and feel good. I personally feel that there are quite a lot of things to be taken into consideration while choosing make-up: the weather, people around us, the occasion and the culture of the place we are in. Personally, I am a big fan of natural make-up that enhances all facial features without going over-the-top! Trends keep changing. Earlier women in the region were associated with heavy make-up. Now, you can see women in America and Europe following this trend while the Middle Eastern women are opting for natural shades and make-up.

You may ask where I find the time for all this? I make the time for my passion while fulfilling my other responsibilities as well. Time management is key and that’s how I can multi-task.

My advice to women would be to wear make-up according to their personality and also their moods. They will then define the person you are.

Saada Al Maskari – Business Planner and Make-up Artist

Not all women like it

Pancakes have never been my ‘thing’. Mostly, because pancakes involve  the complex act of adding layers to them: fruits, nuts, maple syrup, chocolate syrup. I don’t mind having them plain or maybe adding ‘a’ something extra to give them some flavour. The same goes for the pancake effect for the face. I find adding make-up is akin to complicating the simple act of relishing the pancake for what it is. I don’t remember when I discovered make-up, but I do know that I have never been a fan. As a little girl, I was more bothered with covering my books than my face. As a teenager, I was too busy trying to be different from the rest. As I grew older, I began to appreciate lip colours and maybe khol. Even those have now been relegated to secret corners of my boudoir so that the naughty ‘twonager’ in the house does not procure it and go about being Picasso in our leased apartment. As a woman, I should like the idea of dolling up, right? Wrong. It is almost as bad a stereotype as a man being too manly for spa treatments. Not all women like going through the process of adding layers to their face to look beautiful. I don’t like it mostly out of sheer lethargy. It is too much effort. Also, I’d rather not look like Count Dracula’s latest flavour of the month sporting the melting popsicle look brought on by sweating pores. I also belong to the school of thought that champions the cause for looking the way nature intended you to be. We all have been granted certain features that work for us. The problem is they don’t work for others and we tend to see ourselves through their eyes and that mostly causes blurry visions of the self. I like the person I see in the mirror. She is a tired mother with salt and pepper streaks. She is someone who takes on the world and wins one day at a time. She is, to steal from Maya Angelou, “A woman. Phenomenally. A Phenomenal woman. That’s me.”

It is too much effort. Also, I’d rather not look like Count Dracula’s latest flavour of the month sporting the melting popsicle look brought on by sweating pores. I also belong to the school of thought that champions the cause for looking the way nature intended you to be. We all have been granted certain features that work for us. The problem is they don’t work for others and we tend to see ourselves through their eyes and that mostly causes blurry visions of the self. I like the person I see in the mirror. She is a tired mother with salt and pepper streaks. She is someone who takes on the world and wins one day at a time. She is, to steal from Maya Angelou, “A woman. Phenomenally. A Phenomenal woman. That’s me.”

Even those have now been relegated to secret corners of my boudoir so that the naughty ‘twonager’ in the house does not procure it and go about being Picasso in our leased apartment. As a woman, I should like the idea of dolling up, right? Wrong. It is almost as bad a stereotype as a man being too manly for spa treatments. Not all women like going through the process of adding layers to their face to look beautiful. I don’t like it mostly out of sheer lethargy. It is too much effort. Also, I’d rather not look like Count Dracula’s latest flavour of the month sporting the melting popsicle look brought on by sweating pores. I also belong to the school of thought that champions the cause for looking the way nature intended you to be. We all have been granted certain features that work for us. The problem is they don’t work for others and we tend to see ourselves through their eyes and that mostly causes blurry visions of the self. I like the person I see in the mirror. She is a tired mother with salt and pepper streaks. She is someone who takes on the world and wins one day at a time. She is, to steal from Maya Angelou, “A woman. Phenomenally. A Phenomenal woman. That’s me.”

Not all women like going through the process of adding layers to their face to look beautiful. I don’t like it mostly out of sheer lethargy. It is too much effort. Also, I’d rather not look like Count Dracula’s latest flavour of the month sporting the melting popsicle look brought on by sweating pores. I also belong to the school of thought that champions the cause for looking the way nature intended you to be. We all have been granted certain features that work for us. The problem is they don’t work for others and we tend to see ourselves through their eyes and that mostly causes blurry visions of the self. I like the person I see in the mirror. She is a tired mother with salt and pepper streaks. She is someone who takes on the world and wins one day at a time. She is, to steal from Maya Angelou, “A woman. Phenomenally. A Phenomenal woman. That’s me.”

Deepa Rajan-Thomas